• Installation view of Ai Weiwei, With Wind, 2014
    Courtesy of the artist and FOR-SITE Foundation. Photo: Robert Divers Herrick
  • Limited Edition Artworks from FOR-SITE Foundation

     

    Founded by Cheryl Haines in 2003, the FOR-SITE Foundation is dedicated to the idea that art can inspire fresh thinking and important dialogue about our natural and cultural environment. Through exhibitions, commissions, artist residencies, and education programs, FOR-SITE supports the creation and presentation of innovative art about place.
     
    Haines Gallery is proud to present a selection of limited edition artworks commissioned by FOR-SITE from artists such as Ai Weiwei, Shiva Ahmadi, John Akomfrah, and Stephanie Syjuco.
     
    Proceeds generated from the sale of these limited editions will enable FOR-SITE to continue their important work in our community. For more information, please contact Whitney Kear, Manager of Development + Communications at whitney@for-site.org
     

     
  • Created in tandem with FOR-SITE's critically acclaimed 2014 exhibition @Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz, Ai’s artist edition is an unusual...

    Ai Weiwei

    Kite Portrait of Ai Weiwei, 2014

    Created in tandem with FOR-SITE's critically acclaimed 2014 exhibition @Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz, Ai’s artist edition is an unusual self-portrait in the form of a kite, depicting the celebrated artist and activist as an ancient warrior deity — a tongue-in-cheek subversion of Chinese iconography in which the artist casts himself as a guardian of free speech.

     

    Embedded throughout the kite are symbols referring to events that have shaped Ai’s art and life. Holding a piece of metal rebar as if it were a staff or sword, Ai makes reference to the collapsed schools that took the lives of children in the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. His public critique of the Chinese government for their handling of these events ultimately led to his arrest, alluded to by the handcuff around his wrist and the array of surveillance cameras that surround him. Instead of a hand gesture typical of such figures, Ai holds up his middle finger, a fitting address to power by the defiant iconoclast. 

     

    Ai’s fabric-and-bamboo kite is a contemporary version of an age-old art form, produced in collaboration with Chinese artisans, reviving a craft that has a diminishing presence in China. In combining these references of surveillance, censorship, and his own incarceration in the form of a kite, the artist suggests powerful contradictions between freedom and restriction, creativity and repression.

  • Installation view of Sanctuary
    Courtesy FOR-SITE Foundation. Photo: Robert Divers Herrick
  • Organized in response to a moment of increasing global migration and rising nationalism, Sanctuary invited artists from around the world to design contemporary prayer rugs, offering visitors a multiplicity of perspectives on the basic human need for refuge, protection, and sacred ground.
     
    These limited edition Sanctuary artist rugs were ethically woven in Lahore, Pakistan, using traditional hand-knotting techniques, and encompass a variety of thoughtful viewpoints on cultural identity and belonging.
  • Editions Inspired by Sanctuary

  • Shiva Ahmadi subverts the imagery and narrative tropes from traditional Persian and Indian miniature painting to explore religion, politics, and...

    Shiva Ahmadi
    Untitled, 2017
    Limited Edition artwork from Sanctuary
    $15,000

    Shiva Ahmadi subverts the imagery and narrative tropes from traditional Persian and Indian miniature painting to explore religion, politics, and the often calamitous effects that can be wrought on innocent lives when the two intersect — creating the conditions from which we may seek protection.

     

    Throughout Ahmadi's work is the notion of unpredictable threats that often hide in plain sight, using formal beauty to seduce viewers and obscure a violence that is slowly revealed. Her contribution to Sanctuary features a Buddha-like character seated on a lotus throne. But unlike traditional depictions of the spiritual leader, her figure is defaced, bloodied, and perched precariously on a tangle of briars. Instead of Buddha, the enlightened teacher, the artist presents a mere mortal struggling to balance the weaponry of warfare, which could teeter out of hand at any moment. Ahmadi asks viewers to look beyond the surface and consider the implications of our choices and actions, and reminds us of the fine line that separates peace and destruction.

  • Tammam Azzam’s paper collages are the basis for his untitled Sanctuary rug design, featuring fragmented figures and cityscapes from a...

    Tammam Azzam
    Untitled, 2017
    Limited Edition artwork from Sanctuary
    $15,000

    Tammam Azzam’s paper collages are the basis for his untitled Sanctuary rug design, featuring fragmented figures and cityscapes from a home that no longer exists. Azzam’s painterly compositions sit between abstraction and figuration, at once once beautiful and devastating.

     

    The concept of sanctuary is particularly resonant for Azzam; he has used the word to describe his former studio in Syria, which was a refuge from the turmoil he witnessed and experienced before leaving in 2011 for Dubai and subsequently relocating to Germany. The Syria of his memory and the places he held sacred are now gone, forcing him to find solace, comfort, and safety in new locations, new experiences. “My family left with nothing, just our suitcases. We started a new life from zero,” he has said. “But I know I am one of the lucky ones.”

  • John Akomfrah’s practice investigates memory, postcolonialism, temporality and aesthetics and often explores the experiences of migrant diasporas globally. Akomfrah’s rug...

    John Akomfrah
    The Cave, 2017
    Limited Edition artwork from Sanctuary
    $15,000

    John Akomfrah’s practice investigates memory, postcolonialism, temporality and aesthetics and often explores the experiences of migrant diasporas globally. Akomfrah’s rug design for Sanctuary, titled The Cave, is a kaleidoscopic pattern based on prehistoric handprint paintings from Argentina’s Cueva de las Manos (Cave of Hands), an early example of the ways in which art and intention can imbue a physical space with notions of identity, community, and refuge.

     

    “Inside these interlocking caves are some of our first signatures of an idea,” Akomfrah explains. “They are the ghost traces, the carbon footprints of us reaching for and attaining something very powerful, something very long lasting and very human. They are some of the first manifestations of a now near-universal human sense: the idea of an enclosure — marked by a sign of our presence — as a space of benediction, of sanctuary. What the caves tell us, too, is . . . our yearning for sanctuary, both as symbolic evocation as well as real knowledge of an actual place, [is] one of the oldest human yearnings. It’s as old as our sense of home, as enduring as our grasp of time, as defining as our sense of mortality.”

  • Installation view of Alexia Webster, Refugee Street Studio, Bulengo IDP camp, D.R. Congo, 2014-ongoing
    Courtesy the artist and FOR-SITE Foundation. Photo: Robert Divers Herrick
  • Occupying a suite of former military structures overlooking the San Francisco Bay, Home Land Security brought together works by contemporary artists from around the globe to reflect on the human dimensions and increasing complexity of national security, including the physical and psychological borders we create, protect, and cross in what was then an increasingly pervasive climate of fear and distrust.
  • Editions Inspired by Home Land Security

  • Johannesburg-born, award-winning photojournalist Alexia Webster is known for creating images that uncover humanity even in inhumane circumstances. Begun in 2011,...

    Alexia Webster
    Print from Bulengo Studios, from the Refugee Street Studio Project, 2016
    Limited Edition Artwork from Home Land Security
    $1,500

    Johannesburg-born, award-winning photojournalist Alexia Webster is known for creating images that uncover humanity even in inhumane circumstances. Begun in 2011, Webster’s Street Studio series highlights the plights of individuals who live in refugee camps around the world after fleeing violence in their home countries. Her limited edition, produced for Home Land Security, features an image taken in the Bulengo IDP (internally displaced people) camp in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

     

    To create these works, Webster sets up temporary mobile portrait studios in the streets of the camps. Using a portable printer on-site, the artist makes a print for each sitter, thus restoring an important possession that most were forced to leave behind when they fled. The vibrant patterns and colors in her subjects’ clothing and the studio backdrop enliven otherwise stark and somber settings, and hint at the indomitable spirit that shines behind each pair of eyes. “Whether in war or security, poverty or wealth, a family photograph is a precious object. It affirms our identity and worth, and our place in humanity,” Webster explains.

  • Bay Area-based Al Farrow’s sculptures are strangely beautiful meditations on the relationship between religion and violence, with an arresting conflation...

    Al Farrow
    Bullet Cross, 2016

    Limited Edition artwork from Home Land Security
    $2,500

    Bay Area-based Al Farrow’s sculptures are strangely beautiful meditations on the relationship between religion and violence, with an arresting conflation of imagery and medium. Combining a draftsman’s precision with an understanding of metaphor, he makes art from spent ammunition and weapons. In Bullet Cross, a limited edition sculpture from the artist, a familiar religious icon is fashioned from interlinked bullet casings.

     

    Farrow forces us to confront the role that religious extremism plays in instigating violence, and how war becomes its own religion, driven by the global arms trade in pursuit of profits. These harmonious assemblages of disturbing materials aim to provoke thought about the hypocrisy of violence exacted in the name of religion, and the irrational faith we place in instruments of destruction as a source of security.

  • Installation view of Stephanie Syjuco, The International Orange Commemorative Store (Proposal A), 2012
    Courtesy the artist and FOR-SITE Foundation. Photo: Jan Stürmann
  • Celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge, FOR-SITE’s 2012 exhibition International Orange showcased new works by 16 contemporary artists responding to the bridge as an icon, historic structure, and conceptual inspiration. Named in honor of the unique paint color of the span, International Orange offered fresh perspectives on an enduring landmark. The International Orange artist editions emerge from site-specific installations at Fort Point, a historic former military site overlooking the bridge where the exhibition took place, and playfully explore the ways in which humans and the natural environment interact.
  • Editions Inspired by International Orange

  • Stephanie Syjuco’s contribution to International Orange was a souvenir gift shop stocked with an array of wares, all saturated in...

    Stephanie Syjuco
    International Orange Commemorative Box Set, 2012

    Limited Edition artwork from International Orange

    $250

     

    Stephanie Syjuco’s contribution to International Orange was a souvenir gift shop stocked with an array of wares, all saturated in the famous orange shade. Yet none of these products were for sale; Syjuco’s “store” playfully questioned the notion of the souvenir shop, where merchandise is meant to evoke, or even replace, the experience of visiting a place. Visitors were instead offered a free postcard, a reminder that there are many experiences money can’t buy.

     

    Syjuco’s limited edition commemorative box set includes a selection of these items — from familiar souvenirs to those that are less so, such as a quarter pint of International Orange paint and handmade reproduction of one of the bridge’s rivets. Adding yet another layer of irony to the work, now those who may not have even seen the show can literally take home a piece of the exhibition.

  • Installation view of Mark Dion and Dana Sherwood, Encrustations (detail), 2012
    Courtesy of the artists and FOR-SITE Foundation. Photo: Jan Stürmann
  • Mark Dion and Dana Sherwood’s work for the exhibition merged fiction and reality to contemplate the natural history of the...

    Mark Dion and Dana Sherwood

    Concretion, 2012

    Limited Edition artwork from International Orange

    $450

    Mark Dion and Dana Sherwood’s work for the exhibition merged fiction and reality to contemplate the natural history of the environment. Conducting what Dion calls “fantastical archaeology,” the artists envisioned the kinds of artifacts that one might find at Fort Point if it had been inundated by the sea long ago — sculptural versions of ordinary objects made to look as though they had spent a century underwater, artifacts of the historical imagination. Their limited edition print, Concretion (produced with Paulson Fontaine Press in Berkeley), depicts a shoe protruding with molluscs, barnacles and coral, a colorful and whimsical hybrid of the natural and the human-made.