• Photos: Robert Divers Herrick Photos: Robert Divers Herrick Photos: Robert Divers Herrick

    Photos: Robert Divers Herrick

  • Blaze Across the Firmament

    September 10 - November 6, 2021
     
    Haines Gallery proudly presents Blaze Across the Firmament, a group exhibition exploring our relationship to the heavens — those ethereal bodies that illuminate the night sky, mark our place in the universe, and offer us guidance and hope. The skies and cosmos serve as a visual and conceptual reference point in paintings, photographs, and sculptures by Linda ConnorBinh DanhAla Ebtekar, Monir Shahroudy FarmanfarmaianMike Henderson and Chris McCaw, inspiring meditations on the origins and cycle of life and inviting visitors to gaze both inward and out.


  • LINDA CONNOR

  • Throughout her distinguished career, photographer Linda Connor has traveled the world, exploring the relationships between the natural world and our...
    Linda Connor

    October 3, 1894 (Center Star), printed 2014

    25 x 20 inches

    Edition of 10

    $6,000
    Throughout her distinguished career, photographer Linda Connor has traveled the world, exploring the relationships between the natural world and our belief systems. Connor’s celestial images of starfields and constellations, comets, and eclipses were made from antique glass plate negatives housed in San Jose’s Lick Observatory, many of which had not been printed from since their creation in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 2014, Connor began to print some of her most iconic works from this series directly onto aluminum sheets, through a process called dye-sublimation printing. Dark, glistening, and gold-toned, this new medium lends an ethereal quality to already exquisite prints.
    • Linda Connor Sea of Stars, 2020 Framed, overall: 17.5 x 55 x 7 inches
      Linda Connor
      Sea of Stars, 2020
      Framed, overall: 17.5 x 55 x 7 inches
      $12,500
  • Recalling an altarpiece in form, the recent triptych Sea of Stars (2020) comprises three of Connor’s Lick Observatory sublimation prints. The artist digitally layers an image of an ammonite — an extinct, fossilized marine mollusk — onto one panel, and a wind-blowing Zephyr on another, transforming the work into a rumination on our place in — and impact on — the world and in the universe. “It’s about where we are in the largest context,” Connor explains, “and a warning of the fragility of our earth.”


  • BINH DANH

  • Installation view of chlorophyll prints by Binh Danh. Clockwise, from top left: Found Comet (2001); Ancestral Altar of the Cosmos...

    Installation view of chlorophyll prints by Binh Danh. Clockwise, from top left: Found Comet (2001); Ancestral Altar of the Cosmos #1 and #2 (both 2005); Found Eclipse #1 and #2, both 2001; Self-portrait #1 (2002)

  • Binh Danh utilizes early photographic processes to examine connections between history, identity, and place, often within the context of his own experiences as a Vietnamese-American. Blaze Across the Firmament includes a selection of Danh’s early chlorophyll prints, in which comets, eclipses, and other astronomical images are printed directly onto foliage using the plants’ natural photosynthesizing abilities. The delicate and fragile works are then cast into blocks of resin.
     
    Chlorophyll prints from Danh’s 2005 series Ancestral Altar of the Cosmos combine celestial imagery with portraits of those executed at Cambodia’s notorious Tuol Sleng prison. The resulting objects serve as memorials to victims of the Cambodian genocide, reclaiming their identities, and suggest notions of the afterlife and the interconnectedness of all living things.
    • Binh Danh La silhouette of the moon August 21, 2017, 10:12 AM Tempe, AZ, 2017, 2017 7.5 x 7 inches framed
      Binh Danh
      La silhouette of the moon
      August 21, 2017, 10:12 AM
      Tempe, AZ, 2017
      , 2017
      7.5 x 7 inches framed
      $5,000
    • Binh Danh La silhouette of the moon August 21, 2017, 10:43 AM Tempe, AZ, 2017, 2017 7.5 x 7 inches framed
      Binh Danh
      La silhouette of the moon
      August 21, 2017, 10:43 AM
      Tempe, AZ, 2017
      , 2017
      7.5 x 7 inches framed
      $5,000
  • Danh’s daguerreotypes are a result of his three-year investigation into creating one-of-a-kind, “in-camera” daguerreotypes, working with large format cameras modified to accept silver plates rather than film negatives. His 2017 series La silhouette of the moon captures the Great American Eclipse, a total solar eclipse that was visible across the entire United States on August 21, 2017. The crescent shape in image is not the moon, but in fact what remains visible of sun as the moon passes to eclipse it.


  • ALA EBTEKAR

  • Ala Ebtekar’s research-based practice moves between painting and photography, art and science, exploring the juncture between history, myth, and culture....
    Ala Ebtekar

    Coelestis (after Hafiz), 2012

    47.5 x 33 inches

    $30,000
    Ala Ebtekar’s  research-based practice moves between painting and photography, art and science, exploring the juncture between history, myth, and culture. Blaze Across the Firmament includes works from various series that combine cyanotype images of the starry night sky, captured from overnight exposures, with references to literature, philosophy and theology, and the traditional arts of Iran.
     
    The mixed media work Coelestis (after Hafiz), 2012, incorporates pages from a collection of poems by the Persian poet Hafiz (1315-1390), who famously wrote, “Let us be like / two falling stars in the day sky. / Let no one know of our sublime beauty. . . that surpasses / Every description of ecstasy / and love.” Ebtekar overlays these pages with decorative motifs drawn from Islamic art and architecture, creating an elaborate window that opens to an inky blue evocation of the cosmos.
    • Ala Ebtekar Zenith (V), 2015 Four panels, overall: 60.25 x 121 inches
      Ala Ebtekar
      Zenith (V), 2015
      Four panels, overall: 60.25 x 121 inches
      $45,000
  • Created over the course of a year, from fall to summer, Ebtekar’s Zenith (V), 2015, features hand-painted white clouds — stylized designs that draw from Iranian coffeehouse paintings — drifting over a deep blue cyanotype image of the cosmos from the Hubble Space Telescope archives. Each of the four panels was printed on a single day of each season, at the hour when the sun was at its zenith — a single artwork capturing the passage of time across hours, seasons, and millennia.

  • MONIR SHAHROUDY FARMANFARMAIAN

    • Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian Untitled (Heptagon 9), 2016 12.5 x 13 inches
      Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian
      Untitled (Heptagon 9), 2016
      12.5 x 13 inches
      $50,000
    • Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian Untitled (Heptagon 14), 2016 12.5 x 13 inches
      Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian
      Untitled (Heptagon 14), 2016
      12.5 x 13 inches
      $50,000
    • Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian Untitled (Nonagon 2), 2016 11.5 x 12 inches
      Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian
      Untitled (Nonagon 2), 2016
      11.5 x 12 inches
      $50,000
  • Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian (1923 - 2019) spent over half a century creating stunning mirrored mosaics, sculptures, and works on paper that recall both the sacred geometry of Persian art and the reductive abstraction of the 20th century. Light — reflected from the dazzling surfaces of her work — is central to her practice. Recalling her initial visit to the elaborate mirrored interiors of Iran’s famed Shāh Chérāgh (King of Light) shrine, a site of artistic inspiration, Farmanfarmaian wrote: “I imagined myself standing inside a many-faceted diamond and looking out at the movement and fluid light, all solids fractured and dissolved in brilliance, in space, in sun.” This profound experience — at once earthly and celestial — was one that the artist sought to share through her work. In this exhibition, a group of small mirrored mosaics, their pieces configured into complex stellar forms, are arranged into a constellation that echoes the artist’s lapidary vision of the heavens.
  • Hexagon Rainbow (2018), created when Farmanfarmaian was in her 90s, incorporates the artist’s signature techniques of mirrored glass mosaics, reverse-painted...
    Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian

    Hexagon Rainbow, 2018

    51 x 27.5 x 1 inches

    Price Upon Request
    Hexagon Rainbow (2018), created when Farmanfarmaian was in her 90s, incorporates the artist’s signature techniques of mirrored glass mosaics, reverse-painted glass, and the principles of sacred geometries that were at the core of her practice, while incorporating kinetic elements in colorful Plexiglas strands. The work is reminiscent of a window, at the center of which is a six-pointed star surrounded by amber-colored reverse-painted glass. The reflective surface of fragmented glass hints at the historical origins of mirror mosaics in Iranian architecture — pieces of broken mirrors, imported from Europe, were salvaged by local craftsmen, who reassembled cracked elements into designs imitating traditional Iranian tilework.


  • MIKE HENDERSON

    • Mike Henderson Cloud Nine, 1977 54 x 100 inches
      Mike Henderson
      Cloud Nine, 1977
      54 x 100 inches
      $75,000
  • A pioneering painter, musician, and filmmaker, Mike Henderson has been an integral part of the Bay Area art scene for over fifty years. Cloud Nine, a large-scale, mixed media collage on canvas created in 1977, is a pivotal work created at a time when Henderson was searching for new modes of expression following the tumult and violence of the 1960s. Henderson calls his works from this period “space modules.” In these surreal dreamscapes, hovering shapes appear to have landed upon an alien world; Henderson’s experiments with abstract forms and space are expressed as literal forms in (outer) space. Comprising acrylic paint applied with an airbrush or splattered across the surface, charred canvas which the artist burnt in the oven, and colorful pieces of fabric found at Goodwill, Cloud Nine carries a host of associations, from the space race and the 1969 lunar landing, to prehistoric cave paintings of early civilizations, and is a testament to Henderson’s ceaseless invention.


  • CHRIS MCCAW

  • Chris McCaw’s experimental photography harnesses the visceral contribution of natural forces—light, weather, and seasons—to create highly polished images inscribed with...
    Chris McCaw

    Sunburned GSP #928 (Pacific Ocean), 2016

    20 x 12 inches

    $15,500
    Chris McCaw’s experimental photography harnesses the visceral contribution of natural forces—light, weather, and seasons—to create highly polished images inscribed with the marks of their own making. The sun is both subject and collaborator in his iconic Sunburn series. The powerful lenses within his hand-built cameras function like magnifying glasses, allowing the sun to literally sear its path across light-sensitive paper negatives over long exposures lasting anywhere from 15 minutes to a full day, at locations ranging from Alaska, along the Pacific coastline, and the Mojave Desert. McCaw’s work disrupts the idea that a photograph is simply a representation of reality, instead becoming a physical record of the Earth’s movement and the passage of time. Here, the horizon line becomes the site on which our own celestial movements are mapped, connecting the viewer to the larger cycles of astronomical time and planetary motion.
    • Chris McCaw Sunburned GSP #824 (Strait of Juan De Fuca), 2014 Paper, each: 10 x 8 inches Framed, overall: 14.5 x 37.5 inches
      Chris McCaw
      Sunburned GSP #824 (Strait of Juan De Fuca), 2014
      Paper, each: 10 x 8 inches
      Framed, overall: 14.5 x 37.5 inches
      $26,000
    • Chris McCaw Cirkut #4 (Dietrich River, Alaska, Within the Arctic Circle, 48 Hours), 2018 Paper: 8 x 77 inches Frame: 13 x 82.5 inches
      Chris McCaw
      Cirkut #4 (Dietrich River, Alaska, Within the Arctic Circle, 48 Hours), 2018
      Paper: 8 x 77 inches
      Frame: 13 x 82.5 inches
      $75,000
  • Cirkut 4 (2015) takes McCaw’s documentation of the sun to ambitious new lengths. Here, the sun rises and falls behind faraway peaks in a graceful, rhythmic sine wave. Working with a modified 1913 Cirkut camera — a rotating camera that, mounted on a tripod, captured the earliest panoramic images — and a 10-foot long scroll of vintage silver-based paper, the work captures sunsets and sunrises in a single, continuous exposure lasting 48 hours in the Arctic Circle. The making of these photographs involved a constant dialogue between careful planning, calibration, and an element of chance. Weather, a constant if unseen force in McCaw’s work, becomes all the more tan­gible in this series. The frequent interruptions of Arctic winds and storms, often in the evenings, appear as flashes of white against an otherwise calm, grey horizon. The works in Cirkut embody both the immediacy (and dramatic unpredictability) of nature, and the languid passing of time.